Wanted: A Primary Care Doctor

by Lila Lazarus

Adventurous, fun-loving, healthy, 50-something woman seeks intelligent, compassionate, patient, trustworthy and attentive primary care physician for a long-term relationship.

Hard to admit, but I don’t have a doctor. Last year, my general practitioner went “concierge,” meaning his services now cost an extra $3,000 a year— a retainer fee paid by some patients to avoid crowded waiting rooms and get more personalized service.

While that may appeal to me someday, for now, the extra price tag seems exorbitant for someone I see maybe twice a year. So now I’m in search of. And I’m not alone. One out of eight people are looking for a new doctor, either because their doctor retired or changed plans or because of the quality of care from the doctor or staff.

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Be Resolute: Crossing the Finish Line Twice

Facing cancer again, marie is determined to cross the finish line with her oncology nurse navigator, for a second Time

Marie Candiotti has her eyes set on Orlando 2020. Her mission – to run the Disney Princess Half Marathon in full princess costume.

She’s also fighting cancer for the second time around.

“She is the embodiment of courage,” described Marie’s husband, Lou. Self-dubbed Captain of Team Candiotti, Lou has watched his wife face cancer fearlessly since receiving the first diagnosis in 2017.

It was stage 3 ovarian cancer, Marie and Lou were told on Feb. 15, 2017. Marie had been having trouble emptying her bladder, and went to the ER after she couldn’t complete a set of jumping jacks. A lifelong fitness instructor, she otherwise looked and felt healthy. She was working for St. Joe’s ShapeDown program at the time.

This diagnosis was shocking and disorienting.

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Yes, I did that.

St. Joe’s Health Reporter Lila Lazarus broadcast her routine colonoscopy on Facebook Live to raise awareness about the importance of screening and prevention.

“You did what!?”

That’s the usual reaction when people hear I had my colonoscopy on Facebook Live.

Why on Earth would you do that?” is usually the follow-up question.

In case you don’t know what a colonoscopy is – it’s when a trained specialist, in this case, St. Joe’s colorectal surgeon Dr. Amanda McClure, takes a probe with a tiny HD camera and goes six feet in through the patient’s rectum and colon. She examines the lining of the colon – which is where colon cancer starts – and searches for pre-cancerous polyps.

Only this colonoscopy was a little more…public. My colonoscopy was broadcast live on social media. Thousands have now seen the inside of my colon and rectum on Facebook. They watched as Dr. McClure narrated a journey through my large intestine looking for growths on the lining— precancerous polyps. 

Continue reading “Yes, I did that.”

What May Be Wreaking Havoc on Your Body Clock

by Emily Willingham

This article was originally published on Sharecare.

If you find yourself nodding off at 10 p.m. despite your best efforts to stay awake, or routinely opening your eyes at 7 a.m.—even on mornings when you could sleep in—you have your circadian rhythm to thank. This self-sustaining 24-hour internal body clock responds to daylight and darkness to tell us when it’s time to be sleepy and when we should be fully awake. Fending off these messages is tough. Your rhythm is based on a roughly 24-hour day, and once it’s there, it can be hard to shift.

Circadian rhythms are determined mainly by genetics, but they’re also influenced by external factors, such as exercise, meal times, sleep deprivation and exposure to artificial light, particularly the glow emitted by smartphones, tablets and computer screens. Your environment or lifestyle can derail your internal clockwork, which, in addition to sleep, helps regulate your metabolism, blood pressure, body temperature, and hormone levels.

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Join us at our 2019 Healthy Kick-Off on May 18

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CANTON – Join us on Saturday, May 18, from 1 to 4 p.m. for our annual Healthy Kick-Off event at St. Joseph Mercy Canton Health Center.

This free, fun-filled afternoon will feature bike helmets and fittings, access to our Health Exploration Station, health screenings, a meet-and-greet with players from AFC Ann Arbor, a rock wall and teddy bear clinic. Enjoy family fun including:
  • Bike Helmets and Fittings – Limited Supply
  • Skin Cancer Screenings
  • Arctic Edge Street Hockey
  • KONA Ice Truck
  • Meet players from AFC Ann Arbor
  • Semi Pro Soccer Team
  • Rock Climbing Wall
  • Teddy Bear Clinic

Health Exploration Station Celebrates 20 Years! Explore Michigan’s first interactive education center with exhibits to engage all your senses – walk through a giant human body, listen to the rhythm of your own heart beat and test your skills as a surgeon in the brain operating game. A must-see for kids and kids at heart.

We look forward to seeing you there! For more information, visit our website.

Probility Now Offering Comprehensive Pediatric Therapy

ANN ARBOR – Probility Physical Therapy now offers comprehensive pediatric services, including PT, OT and speech.

Led by Dan Santioni, PT, Katherine McKimmy, OT, and Erin Saotome, MA, CCC-SLP, Probility’s pediatric program is geared toward children 0 to 12 years old, and offers a full array of services that address developmental delays or disabilities, neurological disability, sensory integration disability, fine motor impairment, speech and feeding concerns, torticollis to toe-walking and post-surgical rehabilitation needs.

Services are provided at the Clark Road location Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.*:

PT , OT and SLP
Probility Pediatric Therapy
3145 W. Clark Road
Ypsilanti, MI  48197
Phone:  734-712-0566
Print Flyer

*SLP services can be arranged at the Howell Probility office for patients who do not need the entire pediatric team approach.

Be a Blessing for Others

(Pictured left to right) Connie Schuby and Amanda Saracino (Greenbrook Recovery Center behavioral health therapists), Evan Koorhan, and Suzie Antonow (manager of Outpatient Behavioral Services)

Evan Koorhan completed the intensive outpatient program at Greenbrook Recovery Center and now volunteers to help others fighting addiction.

Between managing a local eatery and volunteering with substance abuse programs several times a week, Evan Koorhan lives a busy life. He recently bought a house with his girlfriend and values fellowship with his friends – two gifts he says wouldn’t have been imaginable a few years ago, when he was stuck in the cycle of addiction.

For years Evan used drugs and alcohol to cope with stress and anxiety.

“The only joy I was deriving out of life was using drugs and alcohol and partying with my friends,” he said.

While he was able to hold a job as head coach of a varsity water polo team, and even graduate in 2014 from Eastern Michigan University, Evan kept reverting back to alcohol and marijuana, despite how hard he tried to stop. He even dabbled in therapy, to little avail.

“It was the same thing over and over again, and I couldn’t break the cycle. I would try,” he said.

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Want to Keep Your Heart and Brain Young? Do This

Making this key lifestyle tweak keeps you mobile as you age—but that’s not where the benefits end.

by Kristen Sturt

This article was originally published in Sharecare.

Here’s a startling fact: About 3 in 4 American adults don’t get the recommended amount of physical activity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Even more sobering: Many adults don’t get any activity at all, aside from what they need to make it through the day. And as we age, more and more of us stop moving. Almost 23 percent of adults between age 18 and 44 are sedentary. For those 65 and older, it’s around 32 percent.

While you likely know that long-term inactivity weakens your bones and muscles, you may not realize that it can damage your heart and brain, too. This, in turn, raises your odds of dementia and heart disease, among other conditions, and can lead to early death.

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Celebrate Heart Month with St. Mary Mercy Livonia

Mark your calendar for the following events, and join us in celebrating Heart Month!

  • Friday, February 1: Go Red for Women
    Wear red to promote heart health! Go Red for Women is the American Heart Association’s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Join us in the South Lobby at noon for our annual heart-shaped photo.
  • Thursday, February 7: Ladies’ Night Out
    St. Mary Mercy Livonia’s South Auditorium, 5 pm
    Vendor displays and screenings followed by a panel discussion featuring physicians and community participation. See the flyer here.
  • Friday, February 15 and 22: Jeans Day
    St. Mary Mercy colleagues can wear jeans or different color scrubs for a $5 donation to the American Heart Association. Donations collected in the Marian Women’s Center.

We also invite you to take a photo with the Red Dress cutout in South Lobby and upload your photo to St. Mary Mercy Livonia’s Facebook (facebook.com/stmarymercy).

Finally, enjoy a heart-healthy menu item at St. Mary Mercy Livonia each Thursday in February!

  • February 7: Personalized smoothies with a wide selection of fresh fruits and flavored yogurts
  • February 14: Cranberry oat cookie
  • February 21: Tropical chicken salad, with mandarin oranges, pineapple, chicken, mixed greens, pine nuts, and raspberry vinaigrette
  • February 28: Tossed-to-order pasta, with a variety of sauces to choose from

Stomach Bug or Food Poisoning? Here’s How to Tell

by Taylor Lupo

This article was originally published on Sharecare.

Plagued with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea? There could be several conditions causing your discomfort, such as a bug you caught from your coworker or ingested at your favorite seafood joint. Illnesses like food poisoning and gastroenteritis (often erroneously labeled “stomach flu”) typically cause little more than temporary pain and discomfort. But being able to identify the cause of your sickness can be helpful, should your condition turn serious.

Hugh Bonner, MD, a family practitioner with Saint Francis Healthcare in Wilmington, Delaware and family practitioner Timothy O’Neill, MD with Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in Pontiac, Michigan have both treated their share of patients with gastrointestinal distress. Here’s what they want you to know about identifying—and treating—stomach bugs.