Join St. Joe’s Ann Arbor Nov. 15 for the Great American Smokeout

2017-11-06 14_51_39-sjmhs_smokeout_2017_event_flyer_proof2.pdfANN ARBOR – Join St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor on Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the Great American Smokeout, and take the pledge to quit tobacco use.

St. Joe’s colleagues, patients and visitors are invited to take a smoke-free pledge or support loved ones taking the pledge by visiting tables at St. Joe’s Ann Arbor’s Main Entrance and Reichert Health Center.

Enter for a chance to win free drawings for holiday turkeys, vegetable trays, Couch to 5K classes and a free pair of shoes!

Probility’s East Ypsilanti Clinic Opens Nov. 12

2018-10-24 09_43_43-80031_E_Ypsi_Opening_Postcard_FINAL.pdf - Adobe Acrobat.jpgYPSILANTI – Probility will open its new East Ypsilanti physical therapy clinic on Nov. 12, 2018.

The clinic, located at 1159 E. Michigan Avenue, Suite E, Ypsilanti, MI 48198is strategically placed to serve patients in the E. Ypsilanti, Belleville, Canton and Van Buren Township area.

Services will emphasize manual therapy and the treatment of all orthopedic conditions and musculoskeletal dysfunctions. For more information, call the referral line at 734-712-0570.

 

Shine a Light on Lung Cancer – Nov. 7

SJMAA_ShineALightFacebook(1200x628)ANN ARBOR – Join us for an inspirational evening of hope and remembrance for
anyone affected by lung cancer at our Nov. 7 Shine a Light on Lung Cancer event:

It’s Time to Shine
November 7, 2018
5 – 7 p.m.
St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor
Administration Building – Education Center Auditorium
5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti
Print flyer

RSVP is requested by November 1
stjoeshealth.org/shine-a-light | 734-712-HOPE (4673)

Brought to you by Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in partnership with Lung Cancer Alliance.

Questions and Apertures

by Lila Lazarus

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Photo credit: Costello Candids

It wasn’t a question I wanted to ask. We were sitting with my Mom in her new assisted living facility having coffee and I was going to ask her if she wanted another cookie but instead blurted, “Mom, do you want to be buried or cremated?”

Perhaps I could have been more delicate. Perhaps I could have waited for another time. Perhaps I was insensitive. But the right time never comes for the tough questions. All my siblings were in town to help move my Mom into the new facility. This seemed as good a moment as any. Some say the ideal time for this conversation is before you turn 40 and your parents turn 70, whichever comes first. But that ship sailed for us a while ago.  Mom is 86.  It was now or never. Continue reading “Questions and Apertures”

6 Ways to Help Prevent Stomach Cancer

by Cheryl Alkon

This article was originally published on Sharecare.

Anthony DeBenedet MDBack in the 1930s, stomach (or gastric) cancer affected more people in the United States than any other type of cancer. Today, stomach cancer is way down the list of the country’s most common cancer diagnoses, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). What’s behind the decline?

Assorted lifestyle changes, says Anthony DeBenedet, MD, a gastroenterologist affiliated with Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Currently, there are approximately 26,240 people diagnosed with stomach cancer each year in the U.S. and about 10,800 people will die from it. Compared to other cancers, “stomach cancer isn’t common,” says Dr. DeBenedet. Indeed, the ACS reports that the number of people diagnosed with stomach cancer has gone down about 1.5 percent each year in the past decade, which is good news.

Prevention is Key

Patients have the best chance of recovering from stomach cancer when it’s caught early. But according to the National Cancer Institute, the disease is often diagnosed at an advanced stage when it still may be treated but is difficult to cure. That’s why it’s important to know what factors can help reduce the risk of a stomach cancer diagnosis in the first place.

Some factors associated with a higher risk of stomach cancer are outside your control, such as family history and genetics, as well as your ethnicity and sometimes where you live in the world. But there are other lifestyle factors that you can influence that are important to understand. Read on to learn more about what you can do to lower your risk.

Continue reading “6 Ways to Help Prevent Stomach Cancer”

Warmly Navigating through Mental Health Services

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Kathy Walz (left), behavioral health services navigator at St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea, helps people  struggling with depression connect to counseling and other resources. In this photo, Kathy is with one of her valued partners, Laura Seyfried, director of the Manchester Community Resource Center.

CHELSEA —  “Ashley” had been struggling with depression for a long time.  Many people had suggested she seek help.  Ashley had collected brochures, business cards and lots of phone numbers.  She did not reach out to anyone.

One day, Ashley’s primary care physician referred her to Kathy Walz, LMSW, behavioral health services navigator at St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea.  True to form, Ashley did not call.  But three days later, Walz called Ashley.  Ashley met with Walz to talk about her options; they talked about how counseling could help and what it would be like for her.  Ashley went on to receive the mental health care she needed.  Months later, Walz asked Ashley why she finally decided to get care.  “Because you called me,” she replied.

A behavioral health navigator is a licensed behavioral health clinician who helps connect people with services that are specific to their needs.  Unlike a brochure or someone on the other end of a phone line, a navigator offers a “warm hand-off” for care, specific to the person’s needs and circumstances.  Often times the navigator can work with someone to move past the issues that are keeping them from getting the care they need.  The navigator’s services are free.

“St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea created a behavioral health services navigator position because we knew people were having a hard time accessing mental health resources and understanding what services were available.  We developed the navigator to be embedded in the community.  The navigator’s role is to connect people to what they need, based on their specific circumstances.  To my knowledge, this is a unique position – especially for people who are not our patients,” said Reiley Curran, manager of community health improvement at St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea.

The navigator collaborates with schools, primary care providers, and community-based organizations serving the poor.  The position was created to support people who are struggling with mental health issues.  This program is especially important for people who have a low income and live in rural areas.  Currently, Walz has more than 50 referral sources she can choose from when selecting the appropriate route for someone, including psychiatrists, support groups, therapists, psychiatric RNs and more.

“In our rural area, there were no counselors available for people with low incomes.  It is nice to have Kathy available, at our center, so we can make appointments for our clients to meet with her,” said Laura Seyfried, director of the Manchester Community Resource Center.

The Manchester Community Resource Center is one of many referring partner agencies who connect people with the navigator, Walz.  People in need can be referred to Walz by a primary care physician, a community-based organization, a church, a school, a family member; anyone who recognizes a need.  The service Walz is able to provide is warm, kind and personal; it is non-traditional.  Walz accommodates the person in need by meeting them in a coffee shop, a park, a library, one of her multiple community-based offices – any place that is easily accessible and safe.  Walz is mobile.  She is able to use offices in Chelsea and Dexter, a private space in a Stockbridge school, a little spot above a resale shop in Grass Lake and a private area in Manchester.

Unlike traditional programs, Walz creates her services around the very specific needs she sees.  “Each community can use me, as needed,” Walz said.  “For example, we recognized that seniors were feeling isolated.  So, we created a group just for them to get together.  We also saw that families of people struggling with mental illness needed support too, so we partnered with the  National Alliance on Mental illness of Washtenaw County to offer the Family to Family education series and a support group for family members.  The most important thing is for me to listen to what the community needs, and then give that service to them.”

“Having a navigator has helped because it brought counseling to our community in a non-threatening way.  It allowed our agency to serve as a bridge for our long-time clients to get introduced to counseling in a safe space.  It has opened doors for people who felt there wasn’t any help for them in our community,” said Seyfried.  Prior to having the navigator, Seyfried was only able to direct people back to their primary care physician for help.

On average, 80% of the people who met with the navigator went on to seek additional care.  The model of the behavioral health services navigator is currently being shared with other hospitals within Saint Joseph Mercy Health System to consider adopting.  “The success of the navigator is based on the collaboration of members in the clinical health community,” said Curran.

Drug Take Back Event at Chelsea Retirement Community – Oct. 27

2018-09-12 10_15_15-_ 438_ 80150 SJMC Drug Take Back Event Fall 2018 - Digital Flyer & Facebook ImagCHELSEA – St. Joe’s Chelsea and the Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network will host a drug take back event in partnership with Chelsea Retirement Community, Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research and the Chelsea Police Department:

Saturday, Oct. 27 | 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Chelsea Retirement Community
805 W. Middle St.
Chelsea, MI 48118
Print Flyer

Accepted medications for disposal:

  • Prescription medications in tablet form
  • Controlled substances in tablet form
  • Over-the-counter medications
  • Syringes

Unaccepted medications for disposal:

  • Liquids
  • Inhalers
  • Patches

Walk to End Alzheimer’s – Oct. 7 at WCC

walk to end alzANN ARBOR – Join Team Joe’s at the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Sunday, Oct. 7 at Washtenaw Community College. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. and the walk begins at noon. The event is held to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Learn more or sign up here.

St. Joe’s Ann Arbor Receives Gift of ‘Caring Cradle’ for Grieving Parents

DSC_2361The labor and delivery unit at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor received a Caring Cradle donation from a family hoping to bring comfort to others who experience pregnancy or newborn loss.

Jade and Gasper Rubino made the gift on Aug. 23 in memory of their daughter, Cecily Rosebriar Rubino.

IMG_20180823_105110A Caring Cradle is a bassinet with a cooling system to help preserve a baby’s body, allowing grieving families more time with their baby, and allowing hospital staff to focus on caring for the needs of the family.

The Rubino family worked with non-profit organizations Metro Detroit SHARE and SOBBS (Stories of Babies Born Still) to find placement for two caring cradles in local hospitals. They chose St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor as one of the recipients, stating, “We are beyond grateful to witness the supportive care they provide for their families that experience child loss.”

Chaplain Ruth Tapio gave a blessing during the dedication ceremony, and Jade Rubino shared a few words about loss.

“We are tremendously grateful to the Rubino Family for their very generous gift. This cradle will help support families during their difficult journeys, giving them more time together for creating memories,” Jennifer Schaible, director of women and children’s services at St. Joe’s Ann Arbor, said.

Schaible was joined by Rebecca Kanak, perinatal palliative and loss coordinator, Rosemary Cicala, labor and delivery nurse manager, OB/GYN Dr. Bryan Popp and other senior leaders in accepting the Caring Cradle on behalf of the hospital.