Santa Returns to St. Joe’s Ann Arbor Cancer Center

William Coleman, a former cancer patient beloved by his many caregivers, surprised patients, staff and physicians at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor on Dec. 19.

ANN ARBOR – When William Coleman first donned his velveteen Santa Claus costume last year, he had no idea he was starting a new tradition.

Coleman, who was diagnosed two years ago with colon, bladder and prostate cancer, completed his treatments in December 2016, and visited his infusion clinic nurses last year, cancer-free.

The visit was so popular, Coleman decided to come back, this time to the newly renovated Cancer Center, to spread good cheer to patients and to thank his doctors, nurses and other caregivers. He handed out candy canes, shared words of encouragement, and posed for photos.

Santa made the rounds through the infusion clinic, IHA offices and radiation oncology, before making his final stop visiting his colorectal surgeon, Amanda McClure, MD, and nurse practitioner, Diana Rego. 

Time is Moving Too Fast

by Lila Lazarus

Stop it. It can’t possibly be the end of the year. How did the months fly by? Where did the time go? 2019?! That sounds like some futuristic date in an Orwell novel. Yes, we’ve all heard the older you get, the faster time flies. But this was warp speed.

I remember people saying that if you do the same thing day in and day out, your days will just blend together and move faster. But that’s not my situation. No two days are alike and yet they’ve vanished. Twelve months passed in an instant! I think it slipped by because I wasn’t being a very good witness. I didn’t observe as closely as I could have.

In yoga, we’re told to stay in the moment. Be present.  You’ll be more aware, more focused and less apt to let time drift by unnoticed. I don’t do this on a regular basis,  but I’m determined to savor every last moment of 2018.  Here’s how: Continue reading “Time is Moving Too Fast”

10 Healthy Ways to Handle Excess Stress

by Taylor Lupo

businesswoman freelancer tired, asleep working at computer at ChristmasThis article was originally published on Sharecare.

We all experience stress from time to time. In fact, about 8 in 10 adults feel frequent or occasional stress in their daily lives, according to a 2017 Gallup survey. Common sources of anxiety include money, school, work, relationships or major changes like marriages, divorces and deaths.

“Stress can absolutely be normal,” says Samuel Wedes, MD, a psychiatrist and Medical Director of Inpatient Behavioral Health at St. Mary Mercy Livonia in Livonia, Michigan. “For a lot of people, it can be a motivator to help them work harder or succeed further with their goals,” he adds. In some situations, your body’s stress response can even be life-saving.

Other times, however, it can wreak mental and physical havoc, causing head and body aches, fatigue, restlessness, irritability and even depression. In some cases, stress has been linked to an increased likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes and hypertension, according to Dr. Wedes.

Don’t let your worries go unchecked. Get a handle on stress with these science-backed and expert-approved tricks. Continue reading “10 Healthy Ways to Handle Excess Stress”

CardiAMP® Clinical Trial Could Restore Hope for Heart Failure Patients

Ypsilanti resident is first to be admitted to innovative stem cell trial at St. Joe’s

Retired pharmacist Sam Othman knew he was only stalling the inevitable with the multiple medications he was taking for his heart failure. Diagnosed with heart failure six years ago, the 65-year-old Ypsilanti resident knew there must be something else out there to help restore his health.

“Things had been going slowly, slowly for the worst,” Sam said.

Always inquisitive about new and alternative therapies, Sam began to investigate stem cell treatment as a possible option. He felt the theory – relying on stem cells to generate healthy heart tissue – made sense.

Out of curiosity, Sam searched the web and made a serendipitous discovery that St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor was accepting patients in the Phase III CardiAMP® clinical trial.

The investigational study takes a personalized and minimally invasive approach using a patient’s own bone marrow cells in the treatment of ischemic heart failure that develops after a heart attack, and is designed to stimulate the body’s natural healing response.

“On a whim, I thought somewhere close, someone is doing clinical trials with stem cells,” Sam said.

Sam reached out to St. Joe’s, and after a series of screenings, he became the first patient in the CardiAMP® trial at this site and in the state of Michigan. Continue reading “CardiAMP® Clinical Trial Could Restore Hope for Heart Failure Patients”

Diagnosed with Diabetes? Try One of These Diets

by Debbie Koenig

This article was originally published in Sharecare.

Dr_Marcucci.JPGWhen you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, knowing what to eat suddenly becomes a Very Big Deal. Forget about casually grabbing a cookie in the break room or having a snack whenever you feel like it. Now you have to think about your eating pattern. That’s a fancy term for your diet—the foods and beverages you consume on a daily basis. Luckily, your medical team is trained to help you find the eating pattern that’s right for you.

“The best diet is one that’s tailored to the individual,” says Rachel Marcucci, MD, an internist and pediatrician at Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in Livonia, Michigan. Your doctor should refer you to a dietitian for medical nutrition therapy, which is covered by Medicare and many private insurance plans. “There’s really no reason not to do it,” she says.

The American Diabetes Association recommends several eating patterns for managing diabetes. These are just a few examples that you can try, based on your preferences, lifestyle and dietary needs. However, there are many other healthy eating styles that may work best for you. Your dietitian or doctor can work with you to find a plan that works with your goals and that you’ll be most likely to follow. Continue reading “Diagnosed with Diabetes? Try One of These Diets”

Join St. Joe’s Ann Arbor Nov. 15 for the Great American Smokeout

2017-11-06 14_51_39-sjmhs_smokeout_2017_event_flyer_proof2.pdfANN ARBOR – Join St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor on Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the Great American Smokeout, and take the pledge to quit tobacco use.

St. Joe’s colleagues, patients and visitors are invited to take a smoke-free pledge or support loved ones taking the pledge by visiting tables at St. Joe’s Ann Arbor’s Main Entrance and Reichert Health Center.

Enter for a chance to win free drawings for holiday turkeys, vegetable trays, Couch to 5K classes and a free pair of shoes!

Probility’s East Ypsilanti Clinic Opens Nov. 12

2018-10-24 09_43_43-80031_E_Ypsi_Opening_Postcard_FINAL.pdf - Adobe Acrobat.jpgYPSILANTI – Probility will open its new East Ypsilanti physical therapy clinic on Nov. 12, 2018.

The clinic, located at 1159 E. Michigan Avenue, Suite E, Ypsilanti, MI 48198is strategically placed to serve patients in the E. Ypsilanti, Belleville, Canton and Van Buren Township area.

Services will emphasize manual therapy and the treatment of all orthopedic conditions and musculoskeletal dysfunctions. For more information, call the referral line at 734-712-0570.

 

Shine a Light on Lung Cancer – Nov. 7

SJMAA_ShineALightFacebook(1200x628)ANN ARBOR – Join us for an inspirational evening of hope and remembrance for
anyone affected by lung cancer at our Nov. 7 Shine a Light on Lung Cancer event:

It’s Time to Shine
November 7, 2018
5 – 7 p.m.
St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor
Administration Building – Education Center Auditorium
5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti
Print flyer

RSVP is requested by November 1
stjoeshealth.org/shine-a-light | 734-712-HOPE (4673)

Brought to you by Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in partnership with Lung Cancer Alliance.

Questions and Apertures

by Lila Lazarus

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Photo credit: Costello Candids

It wasn’t a question I wanted to ask. We were sitting with my Mom in her new assisted living facility having coffee and I was going to ask her if she wanted another cookie but instead blurted, “Mom, do you want to be buried or cremated?”

Perhaps I could have been more delicate. Perhaps I could have waited for another time. Perhaps I was insensitive. But the right time never comes for the tough questions. All my siblings were in town to help move my Mom into the new facility. This seemed as good a moment as any. Some say the ideal time for this conversation is before you turn 40 and your parents turn 70, whichever comes first. But that ship sailed for us a while ago.  Mom is 86.  It was now or never. Continue reading “Questions and Apertures”

6 Ways to Help Prevent Stomach Cancer

by Cheryl Alkon

This article was originally published on Sharecare.

Anthony DeBenedet MDBack in the 1930s, stomach (or gastric) cancer affected more people in the United States than any other type of cancer. Today, stomach cancer is way down the list of the country’s most common cancer diagnoses, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). What’s behind the decline?

Assorted lifestyle changes, says Anthony DeBenedet, MD, a gastroenterologist affiliated with Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Currently, there are approximately 26,240 people diagnosed with stomach cancer each year in the U.S. and about 10,800 people will die from it. Compared to other cancers, “stomach cancer isn’t common,” says Dr. DeBenedet. Indeed, the ACS reports that the number of people diagnosed with stomach cancer has gone down about 1.5 percent each year in the past decade, which is good news.

Prevention is Key

Patients have the best chance of recovering from stomach cancer when it’s caught early. But according to the National Cancer Institute, the disease is often diagnosed at an advanced stage when it still may be treated but is difficult to cure. That’s why it’s important to know what factors can help reduce the risk of a stomach cancer diagnosis in the first place.

Some factors associated with a higher risk of stomach cancer are outside your control, such as family history and genetics, as well as your ethnicity and sometimes where you live in the world. But there are other lifestyle factors that you can influence that are important to understand. Read on to learn more about what you can do to lower your risk.

Continue reading “6 Ways to Help Prevent Stomach Cancer”