Be Resilient: Keep Pedaling Forward

After overcoming HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma, Matthew looks forward to embracing an active lifestyle again.

Matthew Robinson was unsuspecting and shocked when he learned that the months of headaches he had been experiencing were likely due to cancer, and not just long work hours.

The 58-year-old triathlete was diagnosed in July 2017 with squamous cell carcinoma, after a PET scan showed a tumor at the base of his tongue.

Even more surprising, Matthew said, was learning that his cancer was probably caused by human papillomavirus, or HPV.

While tobacco and alcohol are two of the most common risk factors of cancers in the back of the throat, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says recent studies show that about 60% to 70% of cancers of the oropharynx may be linked to HPV.

Continue reading “Be Resilient: Keep Pedaling Forward”

Be Resolute: Crossing the Finish Line Twice

Facing cancer again, marie is determined to cross the finish line with her oncology nurse navigator, for a second Time

Marie Candiotti has her eyes set on Orlando 2020. Her mission – to run the Disney Princess Half Marathon in full princess costume.

She’s also fighting cancer for the second time around.

“She is the embodiment of courage,” described Marie’s husband, Lou. Self-dubbed Captain of Team Candiotti, Lou has watched his wife face cancer fearlessly since receiving the first diagnosis in 2017.

It was stage 3 ovarian cancer, Marie and Lou were told on Feb. 15, 2017. Marie had been having trouble emptying her bladder, and went to the ER after she couldn’t complete a set of jumping jacks. A lifelong fitness instructor, she otherwise looked and felt healthy. She was working for St. Joe’s ShapeDown program at the time.

This diagnosis was shocking and disorienting.

Continue reading “Be Resolute: Crossing the Finish Line Twice”

St. Joe’s Ann Arbor Gynecologic Oncology Team Receives Grant to Fund Pilot Project for Ovarian Cancer Patients

Rebecca Liu, MD, Nicole Brashear, NP, and the gynecologic oncology team at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor received the 2019 Geri Fournier Ovarian Cancer Research Award from the Michigan Ovarian Cancer Alliance (MIOCA). The $50,000 grant will fund their pilot project for ovarian cancer patients.

MIOCA announced the research grant on May 8, World Ovarian Cancer Day. Since it started giving grants in 2014, MIOCA has awarded over a half-million dollars to researchers in Michigan who are finding new ways to improve the early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer.

St. Joe’s project, titled, “EASE: Education, Alliance, Solace and Empowerment for Ovarian Cancer Patients” was designed by Dr. Liu and her team, and is a comprehensive curriculum to complement the care and management of ovarian cancer patients.

Continue reading “St. Joe’s Ann Arbor Gynecologic Oncology Team Receives Grant to Fund Pilot Project for Ovarian Cancer Patients”

Be Driven

Michael McCarty, this year’s patient speaker at the annual Shine a Light on Lung Cancer event, credits his survival to a single, desperate message he sent from a hospital bed to transfer his cancer care to St. Joe’s.

Photo_Michael McCarty
Michael McCarty (left) was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2012, when his children were 13, 11 and 7 years old. Today, his cancer is managed with a variety of targeted therapy drugs.

Over the course of his six-year lung cancer journey, Michael McCarty has been to the brink of death and back. And though he accepts the sober truth that time is limited, he tells people, “it’s never too late.”

Michael was diagnosed in September 2012 with non-small cell lung cancer – a type of cancer that occurs mainly in current or former smokers. As Michael would soon learn, it’s also the most common type of lung cancer seen in non-smokers like him.

He was just 43 years old. His children were 13, 11, and 7. He was given 18 months to live. Continue reading “Be Driven”

Be Grateful

Breast Cancer Trial Participant Gives Back to St. Joe’s as Patient Adviser

SandraLymburner_Wide.jpgSandy Lymburner doesn’t like the term “survivor” in reference to her battle with breast cancer, but she accepts it graciously and gratefully. The 57-year-old Ann Arbor resident is four years cancer-free this September, and so far, she’s not only surviving – she is thriving.

She’s quick to credit her success to the team who took care of her at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor Cancer Center.

“You feel like your core group of physicians has their arms around you, and are just taking you in, and are helping you all along the way. I’ve never felt that I’ve been a number or statistic,” she said, adding, “I just felt the care here was incredible, and I wanted to be able to share the good things with people within the hospital.”

Weeks after she was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in the right breast and lobular cancer in the left, Sandy opted for a double mastectomy in September 2014. She got her chemotherapy port the next month, fully expecting that was the next course of action.

But on the day of Sandy’s first scheduled chemotherapy session, Dr. Philip Stella – medical director of oncology at Saint Joseph Mercy Health System, and a long-time friend of Sandy’s – suggested Sandy might be able to bypass chemotherapy altogether.

“He came into the room with a big smile on his face,” Sandy described. Continue reading “Be Grateful”

6 Ways to Help Prevent Stomach Cancer

by Cheryl Alkon

This article was originally published on Sharecare.

Anthony DeBenedet MDBack in the 1930s, stomach (or gastric) cancer affected more people in the United States than any other type of cancer. Today, stomach cancer is way down the list of the country’s most common cancer diagnoses, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). What’s behind the decline?

Assorted lifestyle changes, says Anthony DeBenedet, MD, a gastroenterologist affiliated with Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Currently, there are approximately 26,240 people diagnosed with stomach cancer each year in the U.S. and about 10,800 people will die from it. Compared to other cancers, “stomach cancer isn’t common,” says Dr. DeBenedet. Indeed, the ACS reports that the number of people diagnosed with stomach cancer has gone down about 1.5 percent each year in the past decade, which is good news.

Prevention is Key

Patients have the best chance of recovering from stomach cancer when it’s caught early. But according to the National Cancer Institute, the disease is often diagnosed at an advanced stage when it still may be treated but is difficult to cure. That’s why it’s important to know what factors can help reduce the risk of a stomach cancer diagnosis in the first place.

Some factors associated with a higher risk of stomach cancer are outside your control, such as family history and genetics, as well as your ethnicity and sometimes where you live in the world. But there are other lifestyle factors that you can influence that are important to understand. Read on to learn more about what you can do to lower your risk.

Continue reading “6 Ways to Help Prevent Stomach Cancer”

Low-Cost Mammography Days 2018

2018-09-28 09_41_27-15601_MammographyDayFlyer(2018)-PRINT-D2.pdf - Adobe AcrobatSt. Joseph Mercy Breast Imaging and Huron Valley Radiology, P.C. are offering low-cost 2D screening mammograms for $50 in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month on the following days:

Oct. 18, 2018 |Chelsea

Oct. 19, 2018 | Brighton, Canton, Chelsea, Howell, Livonia, Plymouth and Ypsilanti

  • Women 40 years* and older with no current breast problems and have not had a mammogram within the last year are eligible.
  • Fee is $50 cash, check or credit card (Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express) will be accepted at appointment time.
  • A signed physician order is required.
  • If your mother or sister was diagnosed with premenopausal breast cancer, mammography screening is recommended at age 30, and you are eligible to participate in this program.

Call now for details or to schedule an appointment:

• Brighton, Canton, Howell, Plymouth, Ypsilanti: 734-712-2335
• Chelsea: 734-593-5540
• Livonia: 734-655-1159

NOTE: Callback appointments for further images, 3D tomography, ultrasounds and biopsies are NOT included or covered by low-cost screening.

 

Head & Neck Cancer Symposium: Oct. 26

2018-08-24 09_27_49-17080 Head Neck SymposiumCd2018-8.22.18-PRINT (2).pdf - Adobe Acrobat

Join us Oct. 26, 2018 for our annual Head & Neck Cancer Symposium for Professionals.

October 26, 2018 | 7:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Washtenaw Community College
Morris Lawrence Building
4800 E. Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor, MI
Registration Fee: $100
(continental breakfast, lunch provided)
4.50 AMA PRA Category 1 credits™
Register here

The Farm at St. Joe’s Hosts 2018 Bark for Life – Aug. 25

barkforlifeANN ARBOR – Join us Saturday, Aug. 25 for the American Cancer Society’s 9th annual Bark for Life event at The Farm at St. Joe’s. See flyer.

When: Saturday, Aug. 25, 2018 from 8:30 – Noon
Where: The Farm at St. Joe’s – St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor
Register: www.RelayForLife.org/BarkAnnArborMi
More Info: barkforlifeannarbor@gmail.com or 734 834-3454

Costumes encouraged and prizes available.

Save the Date: See, Test & Treat 2018

seetesttreat-logo
SeeTestTreatSaturday, April 14 | 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Women’s Health Center
5320 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti, MI 48197

  • Cervical cancer screening
  • (Pap test), ages 21 – 64
  • HPV test
  • Breast exam
  • Mammogram, ages 40 – 64

For more information, call 734-712-7881 or visit stjoeshealth.org/see-test-treat

Share the Facebook Event