Isn’t it time you have a colonoscopy?

Colon cancer kills 51,000 Americans every year. That’s more people than a full stadium at Comerica Park. But here’s the good news: Colon cancer is more than 90 percent preventable if detected early. Read that sentence again. Colon cancer is more than 90 percent preventable if detected early. Think of the lives we could save if we just got more people to talk about colons, rectums and bowels and go get checked out. Continue reading “Isn’t it time you have a colonoscopy?”

Probility Now Offering Comprehensive Pediatric Therapy

ANN ARBOR – Probility Physical Therapy now offers comprehensive pediatric services, including PT, OT and speech.

Led by Dan Santioni, PT, Katherine McKimmy, OT, and Erin Saotome, MA, CCC-SLP, Probility’s pediatric program is geared toward children 0 to 12 years old, and offers a full array of services that address developmental delays or disabilities, neurological disability, sensory integration disability, fine motor impairment, speech and feeding concerns, torticollis to toe-walking and post-surgical rehabilitation needs.

Services are provided at the Clark Road location Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.*:

PT , OT and SLP
Probility Pediatric Therapy
3145 W. Clark Road
Ypsilanti, MI  48197
Phone:  734-712-0566
Print Flyer

*SLP services can be arranged at the Howell Probility office for patients who do not need the entire pediatric team approach.

Be a Blessing for Others

(Pictured left to right) Connie Schuby and Amanda Saracino (Greenbrook Recovery Center behavioral health therapists), Evan Koorhan, and Suzie Antonow (manager of Outpatient Behavioral Services)

Evan Koorhan completed the intensive outpatient program at Greenbrook Recovery Center and now volunteers to help others fighting addiction.

Between managing a local eatery and volunteering with substance abuse programs several times a week, Evan Koorhan lives a busy life. He recently bought a house with his girlfriend and values fellowship with his friends – two gifts he says wouldn’t have been imaginable a few years ago, when he was stuck in the cycle of addiction.

For years Evan used drugs and alcohol to cope with stress and anxiety.

“The only joy I was deriving out of life was using drugs and alcohol and partying with my friends,” he said.

While he was able to hold a job as head coach of a varsity water polo team, and even graduate in 2014 from Eastern Michigan University, Evan kept reverting back to alcohol and marijuana, despite how hard he tried to stop. He even dabbled in therapy, to little avail.

“It was the same thing over and over again, and I couldn’t break the cycle. I would try,” he said.

Continue reading “Be a Blessing for Others”

Want to Keep Your Heart and Brain Young? Do This

Making this key lifestyle tweak keeps you mobile as you age—but that’s not where the benefits end.

by Kristen Sturt

This article was originally published in Sharecare.

Here’s a startling fact: About 3 in 4 American adults don’t get the recommended amount of physical activity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Even more sobering: Many adults don’t get any activity at all, aside from what they need to make it through the day. And as we age, more and more of us stop moving. Almost 23 percent of adults between age 18 and 44 are sedentary. For those 65 and older, it’s around 32 percent.

While you likely know that long-term inactivity weakens your bones and muscles, you may not realize that it can damage your heart and brain, too. This, in turn, raises your odds of dementia and heart disease, among other conditions, and can lead to early death.

Continue reading “Want to Keep Your Heart and Brain Young? Do This”

Know Your Risk for Disease

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide? Stroke follows second. Even these conditions do not result in death, they cause disability and diminish quality of life. Know the risks and reduce your chance of having a heart attack or stroke.

Risks factors include:

  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • physical inactivity
  • Obesity/being overweight
  • Diabetes
  • Stress (leads to poor lifestyle choices)
  • Alcohol (raises blood pressure and triglycerides)
  • Diet and nutrition (affects cholesterol, blood pressure and obesity)

What is PAD?

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a serious condition that causes arteries in the legs to become narrowed by plaque. When arteries are clogged, blood flow to the legs and feet is reduced, causing pain and making it difficult to walk.

Symptoms of PAD include muscle pain or cramping in legs after activity, wounds on the legs or feet that are slow to heal, changes in your skin color or temperature of your feet and legs and odd growth changes in your toe nails.

Your risk for developing PAD is increased if you have history of smoking or other health issues such as diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure or obesity. Your age or family history may also be a factor.

There are new, minimally invasive ways for trained cardiologists to help open arteries, reduce symptoms and ensure quality of life is improved. If you’re concerned you’re at risk, talk to your doctor to learn what you can do to lower your risk for disease.

Understanding Your Heart’s Function

Understanding how the heart functions may help you feel more in control of managing your behaviors. The information offered is from the American Heart Association:

valves.jpg

Tricuspid Valve

  • Closes off the upper right chamber (or atrium) that holds blood coming in from the body.
  • Opens to allow blood to flow from the top right chamber to the lower right chamber (or from right atrium to right ventricle).
  • Prevents the back flow of blood from the ventricle to the atrium when blood is pumped out of the ventricle.

Pulmonary Valve (or Pulmonic Valve)

  • Closes off the lower right chamber (or right ventricle).
  • Opens to allow blood to be pumped from the heart to the lungs (through the pulmonary artery) where it will receive oxygen.

Mitral Valve

  • Closes off the upper left chamber (or left atrium) collecting the oxygen-rich blood coming in from the lungs.
  • Opens to allow blood to pass from the upper left side to the lower left side (or from the left atrium to the left ventricle).

Aortic Valve

  • Closes off the lower left chamber that holds the oxygen-rich blood before it is pumped out to the body.
  • Opens to allow blood to leave the heart (from the left ventricle to the aorta and on to the body).

What is Atrial Fibrillation?

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular and often rapid heart rate that can increase your risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.  During atrial fibrillation, the heart’s two upper chambers (the atria) beat chaotically and irregularly — out of coordination with the two lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart.

Atrial fibrillation symptoms often include heart palpitations, shortness of breath and weakness. Episodes of atrial fibrillation can come and go, or you may develop atrial fibrillation that doesn’t go away and may require treatment. Although atrial fibrillation isn’t usually life-threatening, it is a serious medical condition that sometimes requires emergency treatment.

Celebrate Heart Month with St. Mary Mercy Livonia

Mark your calendar for the following events, and join us in celebrating Heart Month!

  • Friday, February 1: Go Red for Women
    Wear red to promote heart health! Go Red for Women is the American Heart Association’s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Join us in the South Lobby at noon for our annual heart-shaped photo.
  • Thursday, February 7: Ladies’ Night Out
    St. Mary Mercy Livonia’s South Auditorium, 5 pm
    Vendor displays and screenings followed by a panel discussion featuring physicians and community participation. See the flyer here.
  • Friday, February 15 and 22: Jeans Day
    St. Mary Mercy colleagues can wear jeans or different color scrubs for a $5 donation to the American Heart Association. Donations collected in the Marian Women’s Center.

We also invite you to take a photo with the Red Dress cutout in South Lobby and upload your photo to St. Mary Mercy Livonia’s Facebook (facebook.com/stmarymercy).

Finally, enjoy a heart-healthy menu item at St. Mary Mercy Livonia each Thursday in February!

  • February 7: Personalized smoothies with a wide selection of fresh fruits and flavored yogurts
  • February 14: Cranberry oat cookie
  • February 21: Tropical chicken salad, with mandarin oranges, pineapple, chicken, mixed greens, pine nuts, and raspberry vinaigrette
  • February 28: Tossed-to-order pasta, with a variety of sauces to choose from

Stomach Bug or Food Poisoning? Here’s How to Tell

by Taylor Lupo

This article was originally published on Sharecare.

Plagued with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea? There could be several conditions causing your discomfort, such as a bug you caught from your coworker or ingested at your favorite seafood joint. Illnesses like food poisoning and gastroenteritis (often erroneously labeled “stomach flu”) typically cause little more than temporary pain and discomfort. But being able to identify the cause of your sickness can be helpful, should your condition turn serious.

Hugh Bonner, MD, a family practitioner with Saint Francis Healthcare in Wilmington, Delaware and family practitioner Timothy O’Neill, MD with Saint Joseph Mercy Health System in Pontiac, Michigan have both treated their share of patients with gastrointestinal distress. Here’s what they want you to know about identifying—and treating—stomach bugs.