The Benefits of Sleep for a Struggling Child

Hyperactivity and sleepDoes your child struggle to focus in school, show aggressive behavior or hyperactivity?  These issues may simply be linked to a lack of sleep, a very common ailment in children.  

Sleep is necessary for a child’s optimal functioning.  A lack of sleep affects every aspect of a child’s development and can cause medical, psychiatric, behavioral and developmental problems.

Symptoms of a sleep-deprived child include lack of focus or concentration, aggressive behaviors, hyperactivity or reduced school performance. Learn more about Pediatric Sleep Services.

Proper sleep is crucial for development and learning, but children who snore may have sleep apnea or a tonsil issue blocking their airway.  It’s important to remember that children who lack sleep don’t necessarily act sleepy.  Unlike adults, kids don’t get tired during the day, they become hyperactive and can be misdiagnosed with ADHD and put on medications they don’t need. 

Led by our board-certified pediatric sleep specialist, Dr. Katherine DeRue, we will evaluate your child for a number of sleep concerns, such as snoring, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or daytime sleepiness. Based on your child’s symptoms, they may need a sleep study. SleepingChild3

St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor’s Sleep Disorder Center provides a full range of services for children:

Ages 3 years and up:

  • Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or other sleep disordered breathing
  • Non-surgical treatment of known OSA or other sleep disordered breathing
  • Evaluation and treatment for daytime sleepiness and Narcolepsy
  • Insomnia
  • Circadian Rhythm disorders

Ages 6 months and up:

  • Behavioral sleep problems

To learn more or to schedule an appointment with a Sleep Specialist, visit www.stjoeshealth.org/sleep or call 734-712-2276

Learn more about Dr. DeRue in this Pediatric Sleep Commercial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAKE YOUR LIFE AN ADVENTURE!

LilaLazarus_ColumnArtRecently, I was asked to speak at an awards ceremony. And though I worked for 25 years as a news anchor and health reporter, instead of giving me the usual introduction as a “TV Personality,” or even “Award-Winning Journalist,” they gave me a much better title: “Adventure Creator.

Helen Keller said it best: “Life is either a grand adventure or it’s nothing.” What’s an adventure? People always think that means jumping out of airplanes or riding a motorcycle across the country (been there, done that.) The truth is, creating adventure is about exploring unknown territory and doing something you think you cannot do. Feeling butterflies in your tummy and doing it anyway.

Sister Anne Marilyn Tyler is an adventurer
Sister Anne Marilyn Tyler is an adventure creator.

And you can create adventure at any age. Take my dear friend, Sister Anne Marilyn Tyler. How do you suppose this spunky 71-year-old photographer from St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor plans to celebrate her 50th year as a religious sister? She’s fulfilling a lifelong dream by visiting the Grand Canyon to spend the night at its base under the starry night sky and attempt to capture a piece of its glory on film. Continue reading “MAKE YOUR LIFE AN ADVENTURE!”

Getting Back on the Dance Floor

Karen Langdon is dancing again, thanks to Dr. Victor Gibson.
Karen Langdon is dancing again, thanks to Dr. Victor Gibson.

Karen Langdon enjoyed dancing, scuba diving and living an active lifestyle with her husband. This all came to a screeching halt when the onset of debilitating pain in both hips, stemming from severe hip arthritis made doing the simple things in life, almost impossible. “It got so bad that I couldn’t do two dances in a row and over time it got worse and worse,” explained Karen.

Following two minimally invasive total hip replacements, performed by G. Victor Gibson, D.O. , a board-certified orthopedic surgeon with Saint Joseph Mercy Health System, using the anterior hip approach, Karen was able to reconnect with her loving dance partner, virtually pain free.

“Now I can go shopping and walk around the mall if I want to, scuba diving of course, and best of all I can go dancing with my husband again,” explains Karen.

DSC_2563“Karen has significantly fewer restrictions along with a reduced recovery time following the anterior hip approach as opposed to more traditional total hip replacements.” says Dr. Victor Gibson.

Karen has re-discovered her freedom, living a life free of pain. “There really are no restrictions after surgery. Just go do it, I recommend it highly, you will be so glad you did. Living a life that’s no longer in constant pain is wonderful”

To hear Karen’s story in it’s entirety visit

stjoeshealth.org/OrthopdicEdge.

Healthy Hydration? No Sweat!

McDowell
Lisa McDowell is a Registered Dietitian at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor. Lisa traveled to the London Olympics to oversee nutritional health for U.S. athletes.

Water is one of the most important components of great health. Water regulates body temperature and keeps you cool in the hot weather. When we exercise, our body temperature increases and we lose water in the form of sweat. Our sweat helps to lower our body temperature so we don’t overheat. We don’t just lose water when we sweat, we also lose key essential electrolytes including sodium, chloride, potassium, magnesium, and calcium.

To find the correct fluid balance, the American College of Sports Medicine suggests the following:

1)      Check your weight:  Be sure to weigh yourself before and after exercise to check the amount of fluid loss. For every pound lost, you will need 16 – 24 oz of water to replenish your sweat loss. Senior citizens tend to be less sensitive to thirst sensations than younger adults. Athletic seniors need to be mindful of drinking fluids regularly.

2)      Monitor urine color: Simplest way to tell if you are adequately replacing sweat loss is to check the color and quantity of your urine. Your goal is to have pale yellow urine which means you are well hydrated. Dark urine means you need more fluid and very pale or clear urine could indicate you are overhydrated, which is also dangerous.

3)      Gauge how you feel: Chronically tired, headachy or lethargic? You may be chronically dehydrated and simply drinking more fluids may improve how you feel.

4)      Prevent muscle cramps:. These are usually associated with dehydration, electrolyte deficits and muscle fatigue. Take extra care to drink plenty of sodium-containing fluids or eat a salty snack while exercising or after exercise if you are sweating in the hot sun.

For athletes exercising more than 2 hours, it is recommended to consume an electrolyte replacement snack. Simple and convenient sources such as energy gels, sport beans, blocks, bars, and drinks may be needed. You can also try eating real-food snacks during exercise such as pretzels, bananas, and fruit chews. You should never experiment on race day. Only use electrolyte replacements and caffeine the day of the race if you have previously used during training.