The Benefits of Sleep for a Struggling Child

Hyperactivity and sleepDoes your child struggle to focus in school, show aggressive behavior or hyperactivity?  These issues may simply be linked to a lack of sleep, a very common ailment in children.  

Sleep is necessary for a child’s optimal functioning.  A lack of sleep affects every aspect of a child’s development and can cause medical, psychiatric, behavioral and developmental problems.

Symptoms of a sleep-deprived child include lack of focus or concentration, aggressive behaviors, hyperactivity or reduced school performance. Learn more about Pediatric Sleep Services.

Proper sleep is crucial for development and learning, but children who snore may have sleep apnea or a tonsil issue blocking their airway.  It’s important to remember that children who lack sleep don’t necessarily act sleepy.  Unlike adults, kids don’t get tired during the day, they become hyperactive and can be misdiagnosed with ADHD and put on medications they don’t need. 

Led by our board-certified pediatric sleep specialist, Dr. Katherine DeRue, we will evaluate your child for a number of sleep concerns, such as snoring, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or daytime sleepiness. Based on your child’s symptoms, they may need a sleep study. SleepingChild3

St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor’s Sleep Disorder Center provides a full range of services for children:

Ages 3 years and up:

  • Evaluation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or other sleep disordered breathing
  • Non-surgical treatment of known OSA or other sleep disordered breathing
  • Evaluation and treatment for daytime sleepiness and Narcolepsy
  • Insomnia
  • Circadian Rhythm disorders

Ages 6 months and up:

  • Behavioral sleep problems

To learn more or to schedule an appointment with a Sleep Specialist, visit www.stjoeshealth.org/sleep or call 734-712-2276

Learn more about Dr. DeRue in this Pediatric Sleep Commercial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Hydration? No Sweat!

McDowell
Lisa McDowell is a Registered Dietitian at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor. Lisa traveled to the London Olympics to oversee nutritional health for U.S. athletes.

Water is one of the most important components of great health. Water regulates body temperature and keeps you cool in the hot weather. When we exercise, our body temperature increases and we lose water in the form of sweat. Our sweat helps to lower our body temperature so we don’t overheat. We don’t just lose water when we sweat, we also lose key essential electrolytes including sodium, chloride, potassium, magnesium, and calcium.

To find the correct fluid balance, the American College of Sports Medicine suggests the following:

1)      Check your weight:  Be sure to weigh yourself before and after exercise to check the amount of fluid loss. For every pound lost, you will need 16 – 24 oz of water to replenish your sweat loss. Senior citizens tend to be less sensitive to thirst sensations than younger adults. Athletic seniors need to be mindful of drinking fluids regularly.

2)      Monitor urine color: Simplest way to tell if you are adequately replacing sweat loss is to check the color and quantity of your urine. Your goal is to have pale yellow urine which means you are well hydrated. Dark urine means you need more fluid and very pale or clear urine could indicate you are overhydrated, which is also dangerous.

3)      Gauge how you feel: Chronically tired, headachy or lethargic? You may be chronically dehydrated and simply drinking more fluids may improve how you feel.

4)      Prevent muscle cramps:. These are usually associated with dehydration, electrolyte deficits and muscle fatigue. Take extra care to drink plenty of sodium-containing fluids or eat a salty snack while exercising or after exercise if you are sweating in the hot sun.

For athletes exercising more than 2 hours, it is recommended to consume an electrolyte replacement snack. Simple and convenient sources such as energy gels, sport beans, blocks, bars, and drinks may be needed. You can also try eating real-food snacks during exercise such as pretzels, bananas, and fruit chews. You should never experiment on race day. Only use electrolyte replacements and caffeine the day of the race if you have previously used during training.