Be the First: How a Stroke Saved Mary’s Life

Mary Abbas (front right) pictured with her husband, Fred, and four children – (from left to right) Greg, Lori, Sandi and Fred.

She’s the first in Michigan to undergo new procedure to block aneurysm

A stroke saved Mary Abbas’ life.

At least that’s the story the 77-year-old Houghton Lake, Mich., resident says she’s sticking to, after making a full recovery and celebrating Easter with her beloved daughters in Florida.

It was just a regular morning in mid-February, when Mary noticed she was slurring her speech as she called her dogs back into the house.

“I knew I was having a stroke,” she said.

She acted quickly – calling her husband and blurting out, “stroke” and “hospital,” before dialing 9-1-1.

Within minutes, paramedics came to her home and rushed her to Grayling Hospital. A cat scan revealed no bleeding in the brain, but confirmed that Mary was having a stroke.

Continue reading “Be the First: How a Stroke Saved Mary’s Life”

Trust Your Intuition: Early Signs of Autism

By Dr. Erin Walton-Doyle, an Internal Medicine and Pediatrics physician with St. Joe’s Medical Group and St. Mary Mercy Livonia

Parents often tell me about a feeling or gut instinct they have about their child. Sometimes it’s a sense their child has an ear infection, other times it’s a premonition their child is in danger.

I tell parents to trust that intuition not only when it comes to a common cold but with concerns about developmental delays. Asking questions or sharing a concern about your child’s behavior is important in order to get a diagnosis and start treatment, if necessary, as soon as possible.

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is a serious developmental disorder that impairs the ability to communicate and interact with others. More than 200,000 cases of autism are diagnosed in the United States each year. While there is no cure, autism can be treated to help reduce symptoms and provide developmental support. The key is early diagnosis and intervention.

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Join us at our 2019 Healthy Kick-Off on May 18

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CANTON – Join us on Saturday, May 18, from 1 to 4 p.m. for our annual Healthy Kick-Off event at St. Joseph Mercy Canton Health Center.

This free, fun-filled afternoon will feature bike helmets and fittings, access to our Health Exploration Station, health screenings, a meet-and-greet with players from AFC Ann Arbor, a rock wall and teddy bear clinic. Enjoy family fun including:
  • Bike Helmets and Fittings – Limited Supply
  • Skin Cancer Screenings
  • Arctic Edge Street Hockey
  • KONA Ice Truck
  • Meet players from AFC Ann Arbor
  • Semi Pro Soccer Team
  • Rock Climbing Wall
  • Teddy Bear Clinic

Health Exploration Station Celebrates 20 Years! Explore Michigan’s first interactive education center with exhibits to engage all your senses – walk through a giant human body, listen to the rhythm of your own heart beat and test your skills as a surgeon in the brain operating game. A must-see for kids and kids at heart.

We look forward to seeing you there! For more information, visit our website.

What You’re NOT Eating Might Be Hurting You

If you’re like most Americans, you’re not getting enough of one vital nutrient.

by Debbie Koenig

This article was originally published in Sharecare.

What if a single nutrient could:

  • lower your risk of death over time by 15 to 30 percent
  • lower cholesterol and blood pressure
  • help you maintain a healthy weight
  • reduce odds of developing diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke and certain cancers

According to a new review, eating enough fiber—the humble roughage that passes through you undigested—may do all that and more.

The research, published in The Lancet, looked at data from 185 prospective studies and 58 clinical trials with over 4,600 participants. A clear link emerged between how much fiber participants ate and their health. Those who took in between 25 and 29 grams a day showed greater benefits, but it is suggested that even higher intakes of fiber could produce healthier outcomes.

Continue reading “What You’re NOT Eating Might Be Hurting You”

Isn’t it time you have a colonoscopy?

Colon cancer kills 51,000 Americans every year. That’s more people than a full stadium at Comerica Park. But here’s the good news: Colon cancer is more than 90 percent preventable if detected early. Read that sentence again. Colon cancer is more than 90 percent preventable if detected early. Think of the lives we could save if we just got more people to talk about colons, rectums and bowels and go get checked out. Continue reading “Isn’t it time you have a colonoscopy?”

Probility Now Offering Comprehensive Pediatric Therapy

ANN ARBOR – Probility Physical Therapy now offers comprehensive pediatric services, including PT, OT and speech.

Led by Dan Santioni, PT, Katherine McKimmy, OT, and Erin Saotome, MA, CCC-SLP, Probility’s pediatric program is geared toward children 0 to 12 years old, and offers a full array of services that address developmental delays or disabilities, neurological disability, sensory integration disability, fine motor impairment, speech and feeding concerns, torticollis to toe-walking and post-surgical rehabilitation needs.

Services are provided at the Clark Road location Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.*:

PT , OT and SLP
Probility Pediatric Therapy
3145 W. Clark Road
Ypsilanti, MI  48197
Phone:  734-712-0566
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*SLP services can be arranged at the Howell Probility office for patients who do not need the entire pediatric team approach.

Be a Blessing for Others

(Pictured left to right) Connie Schuby and Amanda Saracino (Greenbrook Recovery Center behavioral health therapists), Evan Koorhan, and Suzie Antonow (manager of Outpatient Behavioral Services)

Evan Koorhan completed the intensive outpatient program at Greenbrook Recovery Center and now volunteers to help others fighting addiction.

Between managing a local eatery and volunteering with substance abuse programs several times a week, Evan Koorhan lives a busy life. He recently bought a house with his girlfriend and values fellowship with his friends – two gifts he says wouldn’t have been imaginable a few years ago, when he was stuck in the cycle of addiction.

For years Evan used drugs and alcohol to cope with stress and anxiety.

“The only joy I was deriving out of life was using drugs and alcohol and partying with my friends,” he said.

While he was able to hold a job as head coach of a varsity water polo team, and even graduate in 2014 from Eastern Michigan University, Evan kept reverting back to alcohol and marijuana, despite how hard he tried to stop. He even dabbled in therapy, to little avail.

“It was the same thing over and over again, and I couldn’t break the cycle. I would try,” he said.

Continue reading “Be a Blessing for Others”

Want to Keep Your Heart and Brain Young? Do This

Making this key lifestyle tweak keeps you mobile as you age—but that’s not where the benefits end.

by Kristen Sturt

This article was originally published in Sharecare.

Here’s a startling fact: About 3 in 4 American adults don’t get the recommended amount of physical activity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Even more sobering: Many adults don’t get any activity at all, aside from what they need to make it through the day. And as we age, more and more of us stop moving. Almost 23 percent of adults between age 18 and 44 are sedentary. For those 65 and older, it’s around 32 percent.

While you likely know that long-term inactivity weakens your bones and muscles, you may not realize that it can damage your heart and brain, too. This, in turn, raises your odds of dementia and heart disease, among other conditions, and can lead to early death.

Continue reading “Want to Keep Your Heart and Brain Young? Do This”

Know Your Risk for Disease

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide? Stroke follows second. Even these conditions do not result in death, they cause disability and diminish quality of life. Know the risks and reduce your chance of having a heart attack or stroke.

Risks factors include:

  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • physical inactivity
  • Obesity/being overweight
  • Diabetes
  • Stress (leads to poor lifestyle choices)
  • Alcohol (raises blood pressure and triglycerides)
  • Diet and nutrition (affects cholesterol, blood pressure and obesity)

What is PAD?

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a serious condition that causes arteries in the legs to become narrowed by plaque. When arteries are clogged, blood flow to the legs and feet is reduced, causing pain and making it difficult to walk.

Symptoms of PAD include muscle pain or cramping in legs after activity, wounds on the legs or feet that are slow to heal, changes in your skin color or temperature of your feet and legs and odd growth changes in your toe nails.

Your risk for developing PAD is increased if you have history of smoking or other health issues such as diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure or obesity. Your age or family history may also be a factor.

There are new, minimally invasive ways for trained cardiologists to help open arteries, reduce symptoms and ensure quality of life is improved. If you’re concerned you’re at risk, talk to your doctor to learn what you can do to lower your risk for disease.